Patrick Lucito Patient Story – Knee Replacement

After being injured on the job, Patrick needed a total knee replacement. Now, 18 months after his injury, he’s back to work and pain-free.

Injured at work

“I was injured on the job, loading a patient into an ambulance in February of 2020. My foot became caught in the top part of the locking mechanism on the gurney. When I was finally able to free it, I hyperextended my knee. My femur and tibia bones collided, cracking both ends of the bone. It was extremely painful. I wasn’t able to place any weight on that leg. As a paramedic, I knew and worked with many doctors. I made an appointment with the best one I knew."

"COVID complicated my waiting time and ability to progress through treatment options. Between February and September of 2020, I had 2 orthopedic scopes and multiple visits to physical therapy before my doctor suggested a knee replacement. After exhausting every avenue to get rid of the pain, I scheduled the surgery as soon as possible, which put it in March of 2021.”

Not all patients are candidates for this product and/or procedure. Only a medical professional can determine the treatment appropriate for your specific condition.

Deciding on surgery

“I have to admit, I was scared at the prospect of having surgery. But, my pain was horrible. I knew I had to get it done if I wanted any chance at returning to my life and job.

With the time I had between deciding on knee replacement and actually being able to have the surgery, I did a lot of research. I went to the knee manufacturers’ website and researched their products. I also talked to a few ER doctors. They obviously don’t do orthopedic surgery, but they were able to answer a lot of my questions about what to expect, rehab time, and so forth. I also took the extra waiting time as an opportunity to lose a little weight, as my doctor had recommended.”

After surgery

“When surgery time came, I was nervous. Everybody was really nice, even going into the OR, which helped put me at ease. Things went well. An hour after returning to my room, a physical therapist came in and said, we’re going for a walk. Since I had a nerve block, my knee was numb so I used a walker because I couldn’t feel anything. I was able to walk 100 feet, which I thought was incredible.

Recovery was very rough once I really started moving and bending my knee during PT. A common exercise they’d have me do would be to simply rock my leg back and forth while on a stationary bike. I will never forget the moment I was able to go from simply rocking back and forth, to turning the pedal all the way around.

I was so happy that I was almost in tears. 

That was the moment that my fears were overcome with joy and I knew that I was on my way to recovery and getting my life back. Within a few weeks, I was totally off all pain meds, but still icing my knee a couple times a day. My final range-of-motion measurement was 120°!

It’s been a blessing… it really has.”

It’s important to follow your doctor’s orders and work hard in the weeks and months following joint replacement surgery to complete your physical therapy. Talk to your surgeon about whether joint replacement is right for you and the risks of the procedure, including the risks of infection, implant wear, loosening, breakage or failure, any of which can necessitate additional surgery or treatment.

“I have no restrictions as of today and am released back to work as a paramedic. Hard to believe it’s been 1 ½ years since my injury! I’m walking 2 miles a day. My dogs are very grateful because they get to walk again. I’m doing stairs and yard work with no issues at all and no pain. I’m so grateful to my doctor who pushed me to work hard, lose weight, and not give up. I can truly see the light at the end of the tunnel now and with each day, it’s getting brighter and closer.”

Appropriate post-operative activities and pain will differ from patient to patient. Results are not necessarily typical, indicative, or representative of all recipient patients.  Results will vary due to health, weight, activity and other variables.

“I got my life back!! I’m so grateful.”

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